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Library closed for police drill

From 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. today, Love Library was closed for the university’s annual summer emergency drill. Love Library floors 1-5 were the training grounds for SDSU Police and law enforcement agencies throughout San Diego County to practice their response to a violent intruder incident. The exercise also included a test of SDSU’s emergency notification methods, including the SDSU Home page, Urgent page, Emergency Information Line, SDSU Alert (text messaging), and social media sites.

In the photo above, one of our security officers is stationed at the end of Donor Hall to redirect people wanting to access Love Library. The Library Addition was not used in the drill and was open throughout the morning.

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3rd floor lounge in Love Library
New furniture, fresh paint, more electrical outlets, and other amenities will make studying in the newly renovated 3rd floor study area in Love Library a better experience. The area is still food friendly and includes a couple of vending machines.3rd floor lounge in Love Library

Nice, huh?

What are you waiting for…grab your books and your laptop and pull up a chair!3rd floor lounge in Love Library

3rd floor study areaNow you see it…soon you won’t.

The renovation process has already begun in the 3rd floor study lounge. Cabinets of Government Publications materials have already been moved to Current Periodicals and Microforms Center. Plastic sheeting is being hung. Soon, the furniture will be removed, and the area will be closed to the public so the heavy-duty work can get underway.

We think you’ll be pleased with what you see when the area reopens around the end of April. The walls will be freshly painted, and new lighting and upgraded electrical amenities will have been installed (during spring break). You’ll find new tables, new seating, and new study carrels, as well as electronic recharging stations. The area will still be food friendly, so we’re installing paper towel and wet-wipe dispensers so you can help us to keep the area clean.

3rd floor study area

In the meantime, study space is available in Rooms 2203 and 108 (Library Addition and Donor Hall), the 24/7 Study Area, Library Addition basement, and the 5th floor of Love Library. In fact, comfortable chairs, carrels, and tables are scattered throughout Love Library.

Photos of the renovated study area will be posted when the work is finished. Let us know what you think!

The folks from the Army ROTC stopped by today to demonstrate THE fastest way to get from the 5th floor of Love Library to the 2nd floor. They kindly invited daring staff and faculty members to try it for themselves!

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For more than 20 years, the “Hanging Discus” sculpture in Love Library had been, well, hanging…silently…motionlessly…collecting dust. However, if you worked or attended school here in the 1970s or 1980s, you might remember that the sculpture actually moved. That’s right, some of the 17 aluminum discs that compose the sculpture rotate. And now they do again.

“Hanging Discus” was created by George Baker of Altadena, California. It was designed for Love Library and was installed in the central staircase in November 1973. The sculpture hangs 50 feet down the stairwell, and some of its discs are 8 feet in diameter. A single motor mounted above spins the main shaft,discus5 while various discs mounted on ball bearings are free to spin independently.

Thanks to some recent repair work, the sculpture moves again! “Hanging Discus” does its thing between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday-Sunday. Watch a short video of it in action on the library’s Facebook page.

My Spidey Sense told me something cool was going to happen at the library today (actually, an email from a coworker clued me in!). I grabbed my camera and headed to the north side of Love Library, where a crowd had gathered to watch…not Spiderman…but a member of SDSU’s ROTC rappell down the side of the building.

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Door to the Financial Markets LabSomething pretty spectacular is taking place this week in one of the old BATS classrooms (LL261) in the SDSU Library.  Created through a collaboration between the College of Business Administration, Wells Fargo, and the SDSU Library, the Wells Fargo Financial Markets Laboratory is opening on September 21, and it promises to revolutionize the way professors teach finance and financial literacy.

Inside the Financial Markets Lab

The former BATS classroom, which is down a short hallway on the west side of the Student Computing Center,  contained rows of computers and was used by the campus ITS Department to teach basic computer skills to students, faculty, and staff. The old PCs are gone now, replaced by 12 Bloomberg terminals and the Wharton financial database and augmented by a stock ticker and monitors displaying worldwide financial news.

Inside the Financial Markets Lab The lab will offer students from all over campus the skills that are increasingly required to ensure their competitiveness for the current and future job market. It will function as a library resource as well as a classroom where students and faculty will retrieve, process, and analyze real-time economic and financial data.

More information:
Financial Markets Lab Coming to Library

September 11 Rememberance Ceremony, from the 4th floor of Love Library

The September 11 Remembrance Ceremony, taken from a 4th floor window of Love Library.

ROTC cadets from the Army, Navy, and Air Force were in formation at the flagpole on Campanile Walkway. At 11 a.m., the flag was lowered to half-mast, and a lone trumpeter played TAPS.

Arts and crafts fair outside Love Library

The festive tents of the arts and crafts fair lining the north end of Love Library today helped to dispel some of the gloom of an overcast day. Hopeful venders display their wares: T-shirts, pottery, jewelry, incense, tote bags, etc. Stop by and take a look; buy yourself a present or two; then come by the library and see what’s new!

The Hugh C. Hyde Living Writers Series is sponsoring what should be a truly interesting panel on Monday, March 19. At 4 p.m. in Room LL430 of the SDSU Library, four individuals involved in small press and cooperative publishing will discuss the ins and outs of their trade and take questions on the subject. Later, at 7 p.m., they’ll read from their own works. The panel members are

Chris Baron received his MFA in poetry from SDSU in 1998. He is an editor with San Diego City Works Press and is on the executive board for the Border Voices Poetry Project. He also teaches English and writing at San Diego City College and consults on writing programs at other schools. His work has appeared in numerous literary magazines and journals, including Pearl, Aethlon, The Journal of Sports Literature, Sierra Club Press, and City Works. Chris Baron
Tony Bonds has an MFA in creative writing from SDSU. He is the editor for Rainbow Publishers and Legacy Press, which publishes Christian children’s books. He has had short stories published in various online and print magazines, including Thieves Jargon, The Coffee Shop Chronicles, and A Year in Ink, Volume 5. Tony Bonds
Elizabeth Myhr is a managing editor for Marick Press, co-editor of Web Del Sol Review of Books, and online editor of Shining Horns at Raven Chronicles. She is an editor at Calypso Editions, which is an artist-run, cooperative press dedicated to publishing quality literary books of poetry and fiction with a global perspective. Her tasks at Calypso Editions also include online media, social marketing, and managing the day-to-day business. She also works as a freelance editor, and her writing has appeared in several journals including Alaska Quarterly Review and Poet magazine. She is the author of the vanishings & other poems. Elizabeth Myhr
Martin Woodside is involved with content production, finances, and development for Calypso Editions. His poetry chapbook Stationary Landscapes came out in 2009. He studied Romanian poetry on a Fulbright in 2009-10 and is currently translating Romanian poets into English. Martin Woodside

Whether you’re majoring in business, criminal justice, or biology, there’s a lot you can learn from these folks. Chances are, sometime in your future career, you’re going to need or want to publish, and it will benefit you to know what the editors, marketing people, and production people at the publishers of your choice actually do.

Flickr Photos

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